ACSLPA recognizes the existence of systemic discrimination, unconscious bias, and racism which has been highlighted in recent weeks by a groundswell of action here in Alberta, across Canada, and around the world. To be part of the solution, rather than committing to being non-racist which may imply neutrality, we must make a choice to be actively anti-discrimination and anti-racist. This is a time for us as individuals to look at our own actions and biases (conscious and unconscious), as well as a time for the College to reflect, learn and improve.

Under our mandate, ACSLPA serves and protects the public interest by regulating audiologists and speech-language pathologists in their practice. We do this, in part, through setting and enforcing admission and continuing competence standards for the professions, establishing standards of practice and a code of ethics, publishing guidance on professional practice, and investigating complaints of unprofessional conduct.

Diversity, inclusivity, tolerance, and equality must be embraced by all of us. These shared values are reflected in ACSLPA’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice and it is expected that ACSLPA’s regulated members, staff, and volunteers should live up to these ideals.

ACSLPA strives for fairness, objectivity, and respect for all people but this does not preclude unintended and/or unconscious discrimination from finding its way into our systems. We will take action to listen, to learn, and to improve upon our systems, policies, and processes. If you have a constructive perspective to share on this process, please submit it to ACSLPA via the Contact Form.

ACSLPA Launches Project to Address Systemic Racism and Discrimination

ACSLPA is committed to taking action against systemic racism and discrimination, both within the college and as it relates to the practice of regulated audiologists and speech-language pathologists. To this end, the college is forming a taskforce to address the issue. We are looking for volunteers who can contribute their time, perspectives, and insights into this important work.  Learn more here …

Support for the Public

If you have been the victim of discrimination or racism committed by an ACSLPA member, please reach out to ACSLPA with confidence knowing that we are here to receive complaints and address unprofessional conduct by any of our members. You can learn more about our complaints process at https://www.acslpa.ca/concerns-complaints/concerns-complaints-overview/  or contact our Complaints Director, Len Stelmaschuk, at complaintsdirector@acslpa.ca.

Support for Members

If you are an ACSLPA member and are the victim of discrimination or racism in your workplace, you have rights under Alberta OH&S.

If you have been the victim of discrimination or racism committed by another ACSLPA member, please reach out to ACSLPA with confidence knowing that we are here to receive complaints and address unprofessional conduct by any of our members. You can learn more about our complaints process at https://www.acslpa.ca/concerns-complaints/concerns-complaints-overview or contact our Complaints Director, Len Stelmaschuk, at complaintsdirector@acslpa.ca.

If you are looking for ways to address your own unconscious bias, discrimination, or racism, there are resources you can turn to. Here are a few to start your journey:

  • “Calgary Anti-Racism Education”
    A wide-ranging resource provided by the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Center, which is a non-governmental, non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Calgary which undertakes research on contemporary civil liberties and human rights issues that are of concern to Albertans.
  • “Racism 101 – Definitions”
    A glossary of terms that are commonly used in equity discourse as well as in conversations surrounding race and discrimination.